Facebook Patent | Systems And Methods For Content Creation

Patent: Systems And Methods For Content Creation

Publication Number: 10600254

Publication Date: 20200324

Applicants: Facebook

Abstract

Systems, methods, and non-transitory computer-readable media can determine a graphical overlay to be applied to at least one object represented in a media content item; determine a location of the object in at least one frame of the media content item; and augment a representation of the object based at least in part on the graphical overlay, wherein the graphical overlay is animated based at least in part on changes to an orientation of the object across subsequent frames of the media content item.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present technology relates to the field of content creation. More particularly, the present technology relates to techniques for providing users with the ability to create and manage content.

BACKGROUND

Today, people often utilize computing devices (or systems) for a wide variety of purposes. Users can use their computing devices to, for example, interact with one another, access content, share content, and create content. In some cases, media content items can include postings from members of a social network. The postings may include text and media content items, such as images, videos, and audio. The postings may be published to the social network for consumption by others.

Under conventional approaches, users may post various media content items to a social networking system. In general, media content items posted by a first user can be included in the respective content feeds of other users of the social networking system that have “followed” the first user. By following (or subscribing to) the first user, some or all content that is produced, or posted, by the first user may be included in the respective content feeds of the following users. A user following the first user can simply unfollow the first user to prevent new content that is produced by the first user from being included in the following user’s content feed.

SUMMARY

Various embodiments of the present disclosure can include systems, methods, and non-transitory computer readable media configured to determine a graphical overlay to be applied to at least one object represented in a media content item; determine a location of the object in at least one frame of the media content item; and augment a representation of the object based at least in part on the graphical overlay, wherein the graphical overlay is animated based at least in part on changes to an orientation of the object across subsequent frames of the media content item.

In some embodiments, the graphical overlay is re-positioned across subsequent frames of the media content item based at least in part on changes to the location of the object.

In some embodiments, the graphical overlay is animated based at least in part on a pre-rendered set of video frames that capture one or more animations of the graphical overlay.

In some embodiments, the pre-rendered set of video frames are divided into segments of frames, and wherein each segment of frames corresponds to a particular object orientation.

In some embodiments, the graphical overlay is inserted in response to at least one pre-defined gesture being performed by the object as represented in frames of the media content item.

In some embodiments, a second graphical overlay is inserted in response to at least one pre-defined gesture being performed by the object and at least one different object as represented in frames of the media content item.

In some embodiments, the graphical overlay is at least one of: a mask applied to a human or an environmental animation.

Various embodiments of the present disclosure can include systems, methods, and non-transitory computer readable media configured to determine one or more graphical overlays to be applied to at least one object represented in a media content item; determine that a depth of the object as represented in one or more frames of the media content item satisfies a first threshold depth; and augment a representation of the object based at least in part on a first graphical overlay that corresponds to the first threshold depth.

In some embodiments, the systems, methods, and non-transitory computer readable media are configured to determine that the depth of the object as represented in one or more subsequent frames of the media content item satisfies a second threshold depth; and augment the representation of the object based at least in part on a second graphical overlay that corresponds to the second threshold depth.

In some embodiments, the systems, methods, and non-transitory computer readable media are configured to determine that the depth of the object as represented in one or more subsequent frames of the media content item satisfies the first threshold depth; and augment the representation of the object based at least in part on the first graphical overlay that corresponds to the first threshold depth.

In some embodiments, the systems, methods, and non-transitory computer readable media are configured to determine that the depth of the object as represented in one or more subsequent frames of the media content item satisfies a third threshold depth; and augment the representation of the object based at least in part on a third graphical overlay that corresponds to the third threshold depth.

In some embodiments, the object is augmented based at least in part on a third graphical overlay in response to at least one pre-defined gesture being performed by the object as represented in frames of the media content item.

In some embodiments, the media content item is one of: a video, looping video, or live content stream.

In some embodiments, the first graphical overlay is at least one of: a mask applied to a human or an environmental animation.

Various embodiments of the present disclosure can include systems, methods, and non-transitory computer readable media configured to obtain a set of transformations of an object being tracked, the set of transformations corresponding to a world coordinate space; apply a smoothing to the set of transformations; translate the set of transformations to an object tracking coordinate space; and augment a representation of the object based at least in part on the translated set of transformations.

In some embodiments, the representation of the object is augmented using one or more graphical overlays.

In some embodiments, the graphical overlays are attached to one or more anchor points corresponding to the object.

In some embodiments, exponential smoothing is applied to the set of transformations.

In some embodiments, the set of transformations corresponding to the world coordinate space describe transformations of the object relative to at least one camera of a computing device being used to track the object.

In some embodiments, the set of transformations describe changes to a position and rotation of the object in three-dimensional space.

In some embodiments, the object being tracked corresponds to a human face.

It should be appreciated that many other features, applications, embodiments, and/or variations of the disclosed technology will be apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the following detailed description. Additional and/or alternative implementations of the structures, systems, non-transitory computer readable media, and methods described herein can be employed without departing from the principles of the disclosed technology.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates an example system including an example content provider module, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2A illustrates an example graphical overlay module, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2B illustrates an example jitter correction module, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 3A-3O illustrate example diagrams, according to embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIGS. 4A-4C illustrate example methods, according to embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 5 illustrates a network diagram of an example system including an example social networking system that can be utilized in various scenarios, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6 illustrates an example of a computer system or computing device that can be utilized in various scenarios, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.

The figures depict various embodiments of the disclosed technology for purposes of illustration only, wherein the figures use like reference numerals to identify like elements. One skilled in the art will readily recognize from the following discussion that alternative embodiments of the structures and methods illustrated in the figures can be employed without departing from the principles of the disclosed technology described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

* Approaches for Content Creation*

People often utilize computing devices (or systems) for a wide variety of purposes. Users can use their computing devices to, for example, interact with one another, access content, share content, and create content. In some cases, media content items can include postings from members of a social network. The postings may include text and media content items, such as images, videos, and audio. The postings may be published to the social network for consumption by others.

Under conventional approaches, users may post various media content items to the social networking system. In general, media content items posted by a first user can be included in the respective content feeds of other users of the social networking system that have “followed” the first user. By following (or subscribing to) the first user, some or all content that is produced, or posted, by the first user may be included in the respective content feeds of the users following the first user. A user following the first user can prevent new content from the first user from being included in the user’s content feed by simply “unfollowing” the first user. Conventional approaches, however, can have limitations that degrade the overall user experience. For example, conventional approaches may limit modification of shared media content items, visually or otherwise. Accordingly, such conventional approaches may not be effective in addressing these and other problems arising in computer technology.

An improved approach rooted in computer technology overcomes the foregoing and other disadvantages associated with conventional approaches specifically arising in the realm of computer technology. In various embodiments, a graphical overlay to be applied to at least one object represented in a media content item is determined. A location of the object in at least one frame of the media content item is determined. A representation of the object is augmented based on the graphical overlay. The graphical overlay is animated based on changes to an orientation of the object across subsequent frames of the media content item. In various embodiments, one or more graphical overlays to be applied to at least one object represented in a media content item are determined. A determination is made that a depth of the object as represented in one or more frames of the media content item satisfies a first threshold depth. A representation of the object is augmented based on a first graphical overlay that corresponds to the first threshold depth. In various embodiments, a set of transformations of an object being tracked are obtained. The set of transformations can correspond to a world coordinate space. A smoothing is applied to the set of transformations. The set of transformations are translated to an object tracking coordinate space. A representation of the object is augmented based on the translated set of transformations. Many variations are possible.

FIG. 1 illustrates an example system 100 including an example content provider module 102, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in the example of FIG. 1, the content provider module 102 can include a content module 104, a follow module 106, an interaction module 108, and a graphical overlay module 110. In some instances, the example system 100 can include at least one data store 122. The components (e.g., modules, elements, etc.) shown in this figure and all figures herein are exemplary only, and other implementations may include additional, fewer, integrated, or different components. Some components may not be shown so as not to obscure relevant details.

In some embodiments, the content provider module 102 can be implemented, in part or in whole, as software, hardware, or any combination thereof. In general, a module as discussed herein can be associated with software, hardware, or any combination thereof. In some implementations, one or more functions, tasks, and/or operations of modules can be carried out or performed by software routines, software processes, hardware, and/or any combination thereof. In some cases, the content provider module 102 or at least a portion thereof can be implemented using one or more computing devices or systems that include one or more servers, such as network servers or cloud servers. In some instances, the content provider module 102 can, in part or in whole, be implemented within or configured to operate in conjunction with a social networking system (or service), such as the social networking system 530 of FIG. 5. In some instances, the content provider module 102 can be, in part or in whole, implemented within or configured to operate in conjunction or be integrated with a client computing device, such as the user device 510 of FIG. 5. For example, the content provider module 102 can be implemented as or within a dedicated application (e.g., app), a program, or an applet running on a user computing device or client computing system. The application incorporating or implementing instructions for performing some, or all, functionality of the content provider module 102 can be created by a developer. The application can be provided to or maintained in a repository. In some cases, the application can be uploaded or otherwise transmitted over a network (e.g., Internet) to the repository. For example, a computing system (e.g., server) associated with or under control of the developer of the application can provide or transmit the application to the repository. The repository can include, for example, an “app” store in which the application can be maintained for access or download by a user. In response to a command by the user to download the application, the application can be provided or otherwise transmitted over a network from the repository to a computing device associated with the user. For example, a computing system (e.g., server) associated with or under control of an administrator of the repository can cause or permit the application to be transmitted to the computing device of the user so that the user can install and run the application. The developer of the application and the administrator of the repository can be different entities in some cases, but can be the same entity in other cases. It should be understood that many variations are possible.

The content provider module 102 can be configured to communicate and/or operate with the at least one data store 122, as shown in the example system 100. The at least one data store 122 can be configured to store and maintain various types of data. For example, the data store 122 can store information describing various content that has been posted by users of a social networking system. In some implementations, the at least one data store 122 can store information associated with the social networking system (e.g., the social networking system 530 of FIG. 5). The information associated with the social networking system can include data about users, social connections, social interactions, locations, geo-fenced areas, maps, places, events, pages, groups, posts, communications, content, feeds, account settings, privacy settings, a social graph, and various other types of data. In some implementations, the at least one data store 122 can store information associated with users, such as user identifiers, user information, profile information, user specified settings, content produced or posted by users, and various other types of user data.

The content provider module 102 can be configured to provide users with access to content that is posted through a social networking system. For example, the content module 104 can provide a first user with access to media content items through an interface that is provided by a software application (e.g., a social networking application, browser, etc.) running on a computing device of the first user. The first user can also use the interface to post media content items to the social networking system. Such media content items may include text, images, audio, videos, and live content streams, for example. In some embodiments, the software application is configured to send information describing user actions to the social networking system. Such information can include, for example, which media content items the first user has viewed, a respective view duration for each media content item, and other actions (e.g., like, comment, share, etc.) performed by the user with respect to a given media content item, to name some examples.

In various embodiments, other users of the social networking system can access media content items posted by the first user. In one example, the other users can access the media content items by searching for the first user, for example, by user name through an interface provided by a software application (e.g., a social networking application, browser, etc.) running on their respective computing devices. In some instances, some users may want to see media content items posted by the first user in their respective content feed. To cause media content items posted by the first user to be included in their respective content feed, a user can select an option through the interface to subscribe to, or “follow”, the first user. The follow module 106 can process the user’s request by identifying the user as a follower of (or “friend” of) the first user in the social networking system. As a result, some or all media content items that are posted by the first user can automatically be included in the respective content feed of the user. If the user decides that they no longer want to see content from the first user in their respective content feed, the user can select an option through the interface to “unfollow” the first user. As a result, the follow module 106 can remove the association between the user and the first user so that media content items posted by the first user are no longer included in the content feed of the user. In some instances, the user may want to endorse, or “like”, a media content item. In such instances, the user can select an option provided in the interface to like the desired media content item. The interaction module 108 can determine when a user likes a given media content item and can store information describing this relationship. In some instances, the user may want to post a comment in response to a media content item. In such instances, the user can select an option provided in the interface to enter and post the comment for the desired media content item. The interaction module 108 can determine when a user posts a comment in response to a given media content item and can store information describing this relationship. In some embodiments, such information can be stored in a social graph as described in reference to FIG. 5.

In some embodiments, the graphical overlay module 110 is configured to provide options for augmenting objects represented in media content items. More details regarding the graphical overlay module 110 will be provided below with reference to FIG. 2A.

FIG. 2A illustrates a graphical overlay module 222, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. In some embodiments, the graphical overlay module 110 of FIG. 1 can be implemented with the graphical overlay module 222. As shown in the example of FIG. 2A, the graphical overlay module 222 can include an overlay selection module 224, an object tracking module 226, an animation module 228, and a jitter correction module 230.

In general, users of the social networking system can post media content items (e.g., images, videos, looping videos, live content streams) in which various objects are represented (e.g., human faces, pets, vehicles, etc.). In some embodiments, users have the option to apply graphical overlays (e.g., masks, environmental animations) to various objects represented in media content items. In some embodiments, a graphical overlay can visually augment (or modify) the appearance of one or more objects represented in media content items. For example, in various embodiments, a graphical overlay may be applied to visually augment the appearance of human faces and/or an environment represented in a video or live content stream. When a graphical overlay is applied to an object (e.g., human face) in a media content item, users accessing the media content item through the social networking system are shown a visually augmented version of the object with the graphical overlay being positioned relative to the object. In some embodiments, the applied graphical overlay can be animated based on changes to the object’s position and/or orientation across frames of the media content item.

The overlay selection module 224 can provide an interface through which users can select various graphical overlays (e.g., masks, environmental animations) to be applied to objects represented in media content items. In some embodiments, a user can access the interface through a software application running on a computing device. The interface can provide a number of graphical overlays that are available for use. The user operating the computing device can select a graphical overlay to be applied to one or more objects represented in a given media content item. Additional details describing various example graphical overlays that may be applied to objects are provided below in reference to FIGS. 3A-3N.

In some embodiments, once a graphical overlay is selected, the object tracking module 226 can identify objects (e.g., human faces) represented in the media content item to which the graphical overlay is being applied. The object tracking module 226 can apply generally known object detection techniques to identify objects represented in the media content item. For example, in some embodiments, the object tracking module 226 can apply generally known face detection techniques to identify human faces represented in the media content item. Many variations are possible.

Once objects have been identified, the object tracking module 226 can also track the identified objects across frames of the media content item. For example, the object tracking module 226 can track identified human faces as their positions change across frames of the media content item. In some embodiments, when tracking a human face, the object tracking module 226 can also determine changes to a depth and angle of the human face across frames of the media content item. There are many well-known approaches for detecting and tracking objects in real-time. In general, the object tracking module 226 can apply any generally known object tracking and/or video tracking techniques. In some embodiments, such object tracking and/or video tracking techniques may be performed, in part, using cameras associated with user computing devices being used to capture and share media content items. Further, the object tracking module 226 can also apply generally known depth estimation techniques including both software- and camera-based approaches.

The animation module 228 can be configured to visually augment one or more objects being tracked in a media content item using a selected graphical overlay. In some embodiments, the animation module 228 can insert the selected graphical overlay at a position corresponding to an object being tracked. For example, the animation module 228 can insert a mask (e.g., a crown, mustache, rabbit ears, etc.) at a position that corresponds to a human face being tracked in a media content item. In this example, the animation module 228 can continually adjust (or re-position) the location of the mask based on changes to the position and orientation of the human face across frames of the media content item.

In some embodiments, the animation module 228 can insert a graphical overlay based on actions performed by one or more objects being tracked in a media content item. For example, in some embodiments, the animation module 228 can insert a graphical overlay when a tracked object performs some pre-defined gesture. For example, the animation module 228 can insert an environmental animation that displays a series of hearts when a pair of human faces are positioned cheek-to-cheek in one or more frames of a media content item. Many variations are possible.

In some embodiments, the animation module 228 can insert a graphical overlay based on changes to a distance (or depth) of one or more objects being tracked in a media content item. For example, in some embodiments, the animation module 228 can determine (or estimate) changes to a depth of a tracked object across one or more frames of a media content item. In some embodiments, the animation module 228 can insert different graphical overlays based on determined (or estimated) changes to a depth of the tracked object across frames of the media content item. For example, in some embodiments, the animation module 228 can insert a first graphical overlay when the tracked object is located at a first threshold depth in one or more frames of the media content item. In such embodiments, the animation module 228 can transition from the first graphical overlay to a second graphical overlay when the tracked object relocates to a second threshold depth in one or more subsequent frames of the media content item. Many variations are possible. Additional details describing such depth-based animations are provided below in reference to FIGS. 3M-3N.

In some embodiments, the animation module 228 can animate a graphical overlay being applied to an object based on changes to an orientation of the object in one or more frames of a media content item. For example, a graphical overlay representing rabbit ears may be applied at anchor points located on top of a human head. In this example, the animation module 228 can continually animate the rabbit ears over time based on detected changes to orientation of the anchor points, which correspond to changes to an orientation (e.g., position and/or angle) of the human head. In some embodiments, a graphical overlay can be animated using a pre-rendered set of video frames that capture various animations of the graphical overlay. For example, a pre-rendered set of video frames can capture various animations of rabbit ears. In some embodiments, the pre-rendered set of video frames can be divided into segments of frames. In such embodiments, each segment of frames can represent some animation of the graphical overlay that corresponds to a pre-defined orientation (e.g., position and/or angle). For example, a segment of frames may represent some animation of the rabbit ears that can be shown when a human head corresponds to some pre-defined orientation. In this example, when a human head being tracked satisfies the pre-defined orientation, the animation module 228 can identify the segment of frames that corresponds to that pre-defined orientation. The animation module 228 can then animate the rabbit ears by playing (or scrubbing) that segment of frames. Additional details describing the animation of graphical overlays are provided below in reference to FIG. 3O.

The jitter correction module 230 can be configured to remedy, or reduce, animation jitter in media content items. More details regarding the jitter correction module 230 will be provided below with reference to FIG. 2B.

FIG. 2B illustrates a jitter correction module 232, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. In some embodiments, the jitter correction module 230 of FIG. 2A can be implemented with the jitter correction module 232. As shown in the example of FIG. 2B, the jitter correction module 232 can include an object tracker module 234, a smoothing module 236, a coordinate conversion module 238, and an overlay insertion module 240.

The object tracker module 234 can be configured to identify and track objects (e.g., human faces) as represented in frames being captured by one or more cameras of a computing device. In some embodiments, when an object is identified, the object tracker module 234 can determine transformations of the object in an object tracking coordinate space. The transformations can describe positions of the object in three-dimensional space using x, y, and z coordinates. Further, the transformations can also describe rotations of the object along an x, y, and z axis. In some instances, jitter may result as the object tracker module 234 tracks movement of the object. In some embodiments, the transformations of the object can be smoothed to correct (or reduce) jitter.

The smoothing module 236 can apply a smoothing to the transformations of the object. In some embodiments, the smoothing module 236 obtains values describing transformations of the object in world coordinate space (e.g., transformations relative to the camera(s) of the computing device). These values can be obtained from the object tracker module 234, for example. In some embodiments, the smoothing module 236 applies exponential smoothing to the values describing the transformations of the object in world coordinate space.

The coordinate conversion module 238 can translate the smoothed values outputted by the smoothing module 236 back to object tracking coordinate space.

Once translated, the overlay insertion module 240 can augment a representation of the object being tracked. For example, the overlay insertion module 240 can insert (or attach) a designated graphical overlay (e.g., rabbit ears) to corresponding anchor points on the object (e.g., human head) being tracked. In various embodiments, the graphical overlay is inserted based on the smoothed transformations of the object as represented in object tracking coordinate space. As a result, the initial jitter that resulted from tracking the object is eliminated (or reduced). Consequently, both the motion of the object and the animation of the inserted graphical overlay are smoothed and presented without jitter (or with reduced jitter).

FIGS. 3A-3D illustrate an example of an interface 314, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. In this example, the interface 314 is presented through a display screen of a computing device 313. Further, the interface 314 may be provided through an application (e.g., a web browser, a social networking application, messenger application, etc.) running on the computing device 313 that is configured to interact with a social networking system. FIG. 3A illustrates a human face 315 as represented in one or more frames. In this example, the representation of the human face 315 has been augmented using a graphical overlay 316 that corresponds to a rabbit nose and ears. In various embodiments, the location of the human face 315 can be tracked across subsequent frames. In some embodiments, the graphical overlay 316 can continually be adjusted (or re-positioned) based on changes to the position of the human face 315 across the subsequent frames, as illustrated in FIGS. 3B-3D. In some embodiments, the graphical overlay 316 can be animated based on changes to an orientation (e.g., position and/or angle) of the human face 315 across the subsequent frames. For example, the rabbit ears can animate as the human face 315 changes from one direction to another, as illustrated in FIGS. 3B-3D. In some embodiments, the graphical overlay 316 can animate in response to a gesture performed by the human face 315 being tracked. For example, the rabbit ears can extend when the eyes of the human face 315 being tracked are fully opened, as illustrated in the example of FIG. 3D. The example functionality described in connection with FIGS. 3A-3D can be implemented by the graphical overlay module 110, as discussed above. Many variations are possible.

FIG. 3E illustrates another example application of a graphical overlay. In FIG. 3E, a graphical overlay 320 representing a thought bubble is positioned over the head of an individual 319 being tracked. In this example, the thought bubble includes an avatar that animates based on actions performed by the tracked individual 319. For example, in some embodiments, the avatar can animate based on changes to the individual’s facial expressions, as illustrated in the example of FIG. 3F. In some embodiments, the avatar can mimic facial expressions and/or body expressions of the individual 319. The example functionality described in connection with FIGS. 3E-3F can be implemented by the graphical overlay module 110, as discussed above. Many variations are possible.

FIG. 3G illustrates another example application of a graphical overlay. In FIG. 3G, a graphical overlay 324 representing a sweatband is positioned over the head of an individual 323 being tracked. In some embodiments, graphical overlays can be animated based on the presence of additional individuals. For example, when a second individual 325 is identified, the graphical overlay 324 representing the sweatband can be extended to include both the forehead of the individual 323 and the forehead of the second individual 325, as illustrated in the example of FIG. 3H. The example functionality described in connection with FIGS. 3G-3H can be implemented by the graphical overlay module 110, as discussed above. Many variations are possible.

FIGS. 3I-3J illustrate yet another example application of a graphical overlay. In some embodiments, graphical overlays can be animated based on gestures performed by one or more tracked individuals. In FIGS. 3I-3J, a graphical overlay 330 representing a series of hearts appears in response to a first individual 328 and a second individual 329 positioning themselves (or their faces) to be within a threshold distance from one another (e.g., cheek-to-cheek). The example functionality described in connection with FIGS. 3I-3J can be implemented by the graphical overlay module 110, as discussed above. Many variations are possible.

FIGS. 3K-3L illustrate another example application of a graphical overlay. In FIGS. 3K-3L, a graphical overlay 334 representing an ice cream cone is positioned near the mouth of a first individual 333. In some embodiments, the graphical overlay 334 can be shown when the first individual 333 opens his mouth. As mentioned, in some embodiments, graphical overlays can be animated based on gestures performed by one or more individuals. In the example of FIG. 3L, the graphical overlay 334 representing the ice cream cone is tossed on the first individual’s head when the first individual 333 closes his mouth. The example functionality described in connection with FIGS. 3K-3L can be implemented by the graphical overlay module 110, as discussed above. Many variations are possible.

FIGS. 3M-3N illustrate an example application of depth-based graphical overlays. As mentioned, in some embodiments, a first graphical overlay can be shown when a tracked object (e.g., human face) is located at a first threshold depth in one or more frames. In such embodiments, the first graphical overlay can transition to a second graphical overlay when the object relocates to a second threshold depth in one or more subsequent frames. In the example of FIG. 3M, a first graphical overlay 338 representing spotlights is positioned over an individual 337 that is determined to be located at a first threshold depth. In this example, the first graphical overlay 338 transitions to a second graphical overlay 339 representing peacock feathers when the individual 337 is determined to be located at a second threshold depth, as illustrated in the example of FIG. 3N. The example functionality described in connection with FIGS. 3M-3N can be implemented by the graphical overlay module 110, as discussed above. Many variations are possible.