Apple Patent | Scanning Display Systems

Patent: Scanning Display Systems

Publication Number: 20200090569

Publication Date: 20200319

Applicants: Apple

Abstract

A display system may display image frames. The system may include multiple sets of laser dies. Each set of laser dies may emit a respective set of beams of light to a photonic integrated circuit. Each set of beams may include light in at least three wavelength ranges that include visible and/or infrared wavelengths. Channels in the photonic integrated circuit may receive the sets of beams with a first pitch and may emit the set of beams with a second pitch that is finer than the first pitch and at a given angular separation to tangential and sagittal axis scanning mirrors.

[0001] This application claims the benefit of provisional application No. 62/731,448, filed Sep. 14, 2018, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] This relates generally to display systems, including display systems containing microprojectors and displays.

[0003] Electronic devices and other systems often include displays. For example, a head-mounted device such as a pair of virtual reality or mixed reality glasses may have a display for displaying images for a user, or a projector system may include a projector for projecting light fields to a display. The projector may include light sources that emit light fields and an ancillary optical system that conveys the emitted light to the user.

[0004] It is challenging to form a projection and display system with sufficient optical brightness, display resolution, and compactness for a scalable use. Additional care must be taken to consider user cases that include drop shock and thermal loads.

SUMMARY

[0005] A display system such as a display system in an electronic device may display an image frame. The display system may include a scanning mirror and an array of staggered light emitting elements arranged in diagonal rows and aligned vertical columns. The staggered light emitting elements may emit light fields that propagate to a scanning via a lens. The scanning mirror may reflect the image light while rotating about an axis. Control circuitry may selectively activate the light emitting elements across tangential and sagittal axes of the image frame (e.g., using selected timing delays) while controlling the scanning mirror to scan across the sagittal axis at a scanning frequency. This may configure the reflected image light from the scanning mirror to appear as a continuous column of pixels from the image frame (e.g., continuous columns across the entire two-dimensional image frame).

[0006] Additional arrays of light emitting element staggered along the sagittal axis may be used if desired. The additional arrays may have a larger angular spacing to perform foveated imaging operations if desired. The additional arrays may include infrared emitters, optical emitters, and/or sensors to perform gaze tracking. The additional arrays may emit light of other colors.

[0007] In another suitable arrangement, the display system may include a fast scanning mirror and a slow scanning mirror that scan along tangential and sagittal axes of the projected display. That fast scanning mirror may receive multiple beams of light from a photonic integrated circuit. The photonic integrated circuit may receive light from multiple sets of laser dies (e.g., laser dies driven by a corresponding laser driver). The photonic integrated circuit may include channels that convey the light from the sets of laser dies and that emit the light as the multiple beams provided to the fast scanning mirror. The channels may have a wide pitch to accommodate the relatively large size of the laser dies and may reduce the pitch before emitting the beams to maximize resolution of the displayed image frame. The fast and slow scanning mirrors may fill the image frame with the beams of light.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0008] FIG. 1 is a diagram of an illustrative system that may include a display system in accordance with an embodiment.

[0009] FIG. 2 is a top-down view of illustrative optical system components that include a scanning mirror for providing image light to a user in accordance with an embodiment.

[0010] FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional side view of illustrative optical system components of the type shown in FIG. 2 in accordance with an embodiment.

[0011] FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing how illustrative optical system components of the type shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 may be mounted within a narrow optical system housing in accordance with an embodiment.

[0012] FIGS. 5 and 6 are front views of illustrative arrays of light sources having staggered light emitting elements in accordance with an embodiment.

[0013] FIG. 7 is a diagram showing how an image displayed by an illustrative display may include a high definition foveated region surrounded by a lower resolution region in accordance with an embodiment.

[0014] FIG. 8 is a front view showing how illustrative light source control circuitry and interconnected circuitry may be formed between arrays of light sources in accordance with an embodiment.

[0015] FIG. 9 is a front view of an illustrative array of light sources having staggered light emitting elements and microlenses overlapping each of the light emitting elements in accordance with an embodiment.

[0016] FIG. 10 is a rear view of an illustrative array of light sources having contact pads overlapping the center of each light source in the array and having staggered light emitting elements in accordance with an embodiment.

[0017] FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional side view of illustrative arrays of light sources of the types shown in FIGS. 5-10 in accordance with an embodiment.

[0018] FIG. 12 is a top-down view of illustrative optical system components that include two independent scanning mirrors and a photonic integrated circuit for providing image light to a user in accordance with an embodiment.

[0019] FIG. 13 is a perspective view of illustrative light sources for optical system components of the type shown in FIG. 12 in accordance with an embodiment.

[0020] FIG. 14 is a top-down view of illustrative optical system components that include two independent scanning mirrors and a photonic integrated circuit coupled to light sources over optical fibers for providing image light to a user in accordance with an embodiment.

[0021] FIG. 15 is a graph showing how image light may be scanned to fill a field of view using illustrative optical system components of the type shown in FIGS. 12-14 in accordance with an embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0022] Display systems may be integrated into electronic devices such as head-mounted devices or other electronic devices used for virtual reality and mixed reality (augmented reality) systems. These devices may include portable consumer electronics (e.g., portable electronic devices such as cellular telephones, tablet computers, glasses, other wearable equipment), head-up displays in cockpits, vehicles, etc., display-based equipment (projectors, televisions, etc.). The display system or the device in which the display system is located may include a projection system that may be used in other implementations where far-field projection of a light field is necessary. This may include, but is not limited to, wearable ocular devices, home theater applications, and virtual/mixed/augmented reality devices. The projection system described herein contains high resolution and foveated scanning capabilities that are flexible. These examples are, however, merely illustrative. Any suitable equipment may be used in providing a user or users with visual content using the display systems described herein.

[0023] A head-mounted device such as a pair of augmented reality glasses that is worn on the head of a user may be used to provide a user with computer-generated content that is overlaid on top of real-world content. The real-world content may be viewed directly by a user through a transparent portion of an optical system. The optical system may be used to route images from one or more pixel arrays in a display system to the eyes of a user. A waveguide such as a thin planar waveguide formed from a sheet of transparent material such as glass or plastic or other light guide may be included in the optical system to convey image light from the pixel arrays to the user. The display system may include reflective displays such as liquid-crystal-on-silicon displays, microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) displays (sometimes referred to as digital micromirror devices), or other displays.

[0024] A schematic diagram of an illustrative system that may be provided with a display system is shown in FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 1, system 10 may be a home theater system, television system, head-mounted device, electronic device, or other system for projecting far field image light. System 10 may include support structures such as support structure 20. In scenarios where system 10 is a head-mounted device, support structure 20 may include head-mounted support structures. The components of system 10 may be supported by support structure 20. Support structure 20, which may sometimes be referred to as a housing or case, may be configured to form a frame of a pair of glasses (e.g., left and right temples and other frame members), may be configured to form a helmet, may be configured to form a pair of goggles, or may have other head-mountable configurations, or may be configured to form any other desired housing structures for some or all of the components in system 10.

[0025] The operation of system 10 may be controlled using control circuitry 16. Control circuitry 16 may include storage and processing circuitry for controlling the operation of system 10. Circuitry 16 may include storage such as hard disk drive storage, nonvolatile memory (e.g., electrically-programmable-read-only memory configured to form a solid state drive), volatile memory (e.g., static or dynamic random-access-memory), etc. Processing circuitry in control circuitry 16 may be based on one or more microprocessors, microcontrollers, digital signal processors, baseband processors, power management units, audio chips, graphics processing units, application specific integrated circuits, and other integrated circuits. Software code may be stored on storage in circuitry 16 and run on processing circuitry in circuitry 16 to implement operations for system 10 (e.g., data gathering operations, operations involving the adjustment of components using control signals, image rendering operations to produce image content to be displayed for a user, etc.).

[0026] System 10 may include input-output circuitry such as input-output devices 12. Input-output devices 12 may be used to allow data to be received by system 10 from external equipment (e.g., a tethered computer, a portable device such as a handheld device or laptop computer, or other electrical equipment) and to allow a user to provide system 10 with user input. Input-output devices 12 may also be used to gather information on the environment in which system 10 is operating. Output components in devices 12 may allow system 10 to provide a user with output and may be used to communicate with external electrical equipment. Input-output devices 12 may include sensors and other components 18 (e.g., image sensors for gathering images of real-world object that are digitally merged with virtual objects on a display in system 10, accelerometers, depth sensors, light sensors, haptic output devices, speakers, batteries, wireless communications circuits for communicating between system 10 and external electronic equipment, etc.).

[0027] As shown in FIG. 1, input-output devices 12 may include one or more displays in a display system such as display system 14. Display system 14, which may sometimes be referred to as a display or light engine, may be used to display images for a user or users of system 10. Display system 14 include light sources such as light sources 14A that produce illumination (image light) 22. Illumination 22 may pass through optical system 14B. Light sources 14A may include arrays of light sources having light emitting elements (e.g., pixels). Optical system 14B may include one or more scanning mirrors that scan the light emitted by the light emitting elements (light 22) towards one or more users at location 24 for viewing. In scenarios where system 10 is implemented on a head-mounted device, location 24 may be an eye box, for example. In scenarios where system 10 is implemented in other types of display-based devices, location 10 may be a projector screen or other display screen, a wall, or any other desired far-field location. Selectively activating the light elements in light sources 14A and scanning the mirrors across one or two dimensions (axes) may allow two-dimensional images to be projected at location 24 (e.g., across a field of view of at location 24).

[0028] Optical system 14B may include other optical components such as prisms, additional mirrors, beam splitters, holograms, gratings (e.g., electrically tunable gratings), lenses, waveguides, polarizers, and/or other optical components to convey light 22 to location 24. If desired, system 14B may contain components (e.g., an optical combiner, etc.) to allow real-world image light 26 (e.g., real-world images or real-world objects such as real-world object 28) to be combined optically with virtual (computer-generated) images such as virtual images in image light 22. In this type of system, which is sometimes referred to as an augmented reality system, a user of system 10 may view both real-world content and computer-generated content that is overlaid on top of the real-world content. Camera-based augmented reality systems may also be used in system 10 (e.g., in an arrangement which a camera captures real-world images of object 28 and this content is digitally merged with virtual content on display system 14). Display system 14 may be used in a virtual reality system (e.g., a system without merged real-world content) and/or any suitable type of system for projecting light to a desired display location.

[0029] In general, it is desirable to provide the scanning mirrors in optical system 14B as large a reflective area as possible (e.g., 1.2-2.0 mm in diameter) in order to maximize image resolution in the far-field domain. Smaller mirrors, for example, generate greater light divergence and thus lower resolution in the far-field than larger mirrors. At the same time, the scanning mirrors need to scan (rotate) at a relatively high speed (frequency) to allow the images to be displayed with a suitably high frame rate. However, scanning the mirrors at high speeds can cause physical deformation in the mirror (particularly for relatively large mirrors), which serves to diverge the image light and thus limit image resolution in the far-field. It would therefore be desirable to be able to provide optical systems 14B that can overcome these difficulties to provide high resolution (low divergence) images at high frame rates while still allowing the optical system to fit within the constrained form factor of system 10.

[0030] FIG. 2 is a top-down view of display system 14 in an illustrative configuration in which optical system 14B includes a single scanning mirror. As shown in FIG. 2, optical system 14B may include lenses 40 and scanning mirror 42. Light sources 14A emit image light (light fields) 22 that propagate to scanning mirror 42 via lenses 40. Scanning mirror 42 rotates about axis 30 (extending parallel to the Z-axis of FIG. 2), as shown by arrows 32. Scanning mirror 42 may include a motor, actuators, MEMS structures, or any other desired structures that control mirror 42 to rotate around axis 30 with a desired scanning frequency. Scanning mirror 42 reflects light 22 towards other optical components 14C in display 14 and provides coverage over a corresponding field of view 38 as the mirror is scanned (rotated) about axis 30. Field of view 38 may be 45 degrees, between 40 and 50 degrees, less than 40 degrees, greater than 45 degrees, or any other desired field of view.

[0031] Other optical components 14C may include projection optics (e.g., optical components for projecting the image light on a display screen, projector screen, wall, or any other desired location 24 as shown in FIG. 1), lenses, beam splitters, optical couplers (e.g., input couplers, output couplers, cross-couplers, etc.), prisms, additional mirrors, holograms, gratings (e.g., electrically tunable gratings), waveguides, polarizers, and/or other optical components to convey light 22 to location 24 (FIG. 1). If desired, light sources 14A and optical system 14B may be mounted within an optical system housing such as housing 34. Housing 34 may include metal, dielectric, or other materials and may protect optical system 34 from misalignment, stray light, dust, or other contaminants. Housing 34 may include a window 36 that passes light 22 after being reflected off of scanning mirror 42.

[0032] In order to minimize far field light divergence and thus maximize far-field image resolution, scanning mirror 42 may rotate at a relatively low speed such as the frame rate with which images (image frames) are displayed using display system 14 (e.g., the frame rate of light sources 14A). As an example, scanning mirror 42 may rotate at 60 Hz, 120 Hz, 24 Hz, between 24 and 120 Hz, between 120 Hz and 240 Hz, greater than 120 Hz, or any other desired frequency. Because scanning mirror 42 rotates at a relatively low speed, scanning mirror 42 may perform scanning operations without causing significant mechanical deformation to the mirror, thereby maximizing mirror size (without introducing excessive deformation), minimizing far-field light divergence, and maximizing image resolution in the far-field. This horizontal scanning performed by mirror 42 (e.g., in the direction of arrows 32 around axis 30) may cause light 22 to fill (paint) one dimension of a two-dimensional image frame in the far field that is displayed using display system 14. This dimension is sometimes referred to herein as the sagittal axis of display system 14 or the sagittal axis of the displayed image. The axis orthogonal to the sagittal axis is used to fill (paint) the remainder of the two-dimensional image frame with image light and is sometimes referred to herein as the tangential axis of display system 14 or the tangential axis of the displayed image (e.g., parallel to the Z-axis of FIG. 2).

[0033] In some scenarios, an additional mirror is used to scan over the tangential axis. These tangential axis mirrors rotate at a higher frequency and can limit far-field image resolution. By omitting an additional mirror for covering the tangential axis in the example of FIG. 2, far-field image resolution may be maximized. In the example of FIG. 2, light sources 14A may include one or more arrays of light sources arranged in rows and columns. There may be significantly more rows M than columns N in each of the arrays (e.g., M may be at least 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 1000, etc. times N). Each array may therefore have insufficient width (parallel to the Y-axis of FIG. 2) to cover the entire sagittal axis of display system 14B, but has sufficient height (parallel to the Z-axis of FIG. 2) to cover the entire tangential axis of display system 14B. Arrays of this type may sometimes be referred to herein as 1.5 dimensional arrays or 1.5D arrays. Arrays that have less than 10 times the number of rows as columns may sometimes be referred to herein as 2D arrays. Arrays that have one row or one column may sometimes be referred to herein as 1D arrays.

[0034] Light sources 14A may include multiple 1.5D arrays (e.g., separate arrays for emitting different colors such as red (R), green (G), and blue (B) arrays). Control circuitry 16 (FIG. 1) may selectively activate (e.g., turn on/off) the light sources in each 1.5D array with a suitable timing scheme to fill (paint) the tangential axis of display system 14B with far-field light of each color. When combined with the sagittal axis rotation of scanning mirror 42, display system 14 may produce two-dimensional far-field images at a high frame rate and having multiple colors with maximal resolution.

[0035] FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional side view of display system 14 of FIG. 2 (e.g., as taken in the direction of arrow 42 of FIG. 2). As shown in FIG. 3, light sources 14A (e.g., the 1.5D arrays) have a greater height (parallel to the Z-axis) than width (parallel to the Y-axis) for covering the tangential axis of the display system. Output collimating optics 40 (e.g., multiple lenses) may collimate light 22 (e.g., .about.0.4-1 mRad) from the arrays and may direct the light at scanning mirror 42. Scanning mirror 42 rotates around axis 30, as shown by arrows 32, to cover the sagittal axis. The selective activation of light sources across the 1.5D arrays in light sources 14A in combination with rotation of scanning mirror 42 allow light 22 to form a two-dimensional far-field image frame. In the example of FIG. 3, optical system housing 34 is shown as only enclosing lenses 40. This is merely illustrative and, if desired, housing 34 may also surround light sources 14A and/or scanning mirror 42 (e.g., as shown in FIG. 2). Lenses 40 may, for example, be split lenses (sometimes referred to herein as chopped optics or chopped lenses) that are cut in one or more dimensions rather than exhibiting a circular profile in the Y-Z plane (e.g., to help fit the lenses within a relatively narrow housing 34). Because the array of emitters are longer in one dimension (e.g., a non-scanning direction), lenses 40 may include chopped optics to help conserve space without affecting image quality.

[0036] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of display system 14 of FIGS. 2 and 3. As shown in FIG. 4, optical system housing 34 has a window 36. Scanning mirror 42 in housing 34 reflects light 22 through window 36, as shown by arrow 50 (e.g., to other optical components 14C of FIG. 2). Housing 34 may have a length 52, a width 56, and a height 54. Length 52 may be greater than height 54 and height 54 may be greater than width 56. As an example, length 52 may be 30-40 mm, 20-50 mm, 32-38 mm, greater than 50 mm, less than 20 mm, or any other desired length. Width 56 may be 4-6 mm, 3-10 mm, 5-20 mm, greater than 20 mm, or any other desired width. Height 54 may be 15-20 mm, 10-25 mm, 15-30 mm, greater than 30 mm, less than 15 mm, or any other desired height. In this way, housing 34, light sources 14A, and optical system 14B may exhibit a relatively narrow profile. This may allow display 14 to be integrated within systems 10 having relatively narrow profiles such as head mounted devices (e.g., within the temple of a glasses frame, helmet, goggles, etc.) or other miniaturized or portable display systems.

[0037] FIG. 5 is a front view of light sources 14A in display 14 (e.g., as taken in the direction of arrow 44 of FIG. 2). As shown in FIG. 5, light sources 14A may include a light projector such as light projector 70. Light projector 70 includes one or more 1.5D arrays 60 of light sources 76 such as 1.5D arrays 60A, 60B, and 60C. The light sources 76 in each array 60 (sometimes referred to herein as light cells 76, light source cells 76, cells 76, or unit cells 76) may be arranged in a rectangular grid pattern having rows and columns. Because each array 60 is a 1.5D array, there are significantly more rows of cells 76 (e.g., extending parallel to the Y-axis) than columns of cells 76 (e.g., extending parallel to the Z-axis) in each array.

[0038] Each cell 76 may include a corresponding light emitting element 74 formed on an underlying substrate 75 (e.g., an array substrate such as a semiconductor substrate). Light emitting elements 74 may include light emitting diodes (LEDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), resonant cavity light emitting diodes (RCLEDs), micro light emitting diodes (.mu.LEDs), lasers (e.g., vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)), or any other desired light emitting components. Different arrays 60 in projector 70 may include different types of light emitting elements 74 (e.g., one array 60 may include RCLEDs whereas another array 60 includes VCSELs, etc.). This may allow light any desired color to be emitted by projector 70 (e.g., in scenarios where a single type of light emitting element is not capable of producing light of a particular desired wavelength). Light emitting elements 74 may sometimes be referred to herein as pixels 74.

[0039] Each light emitting element 74 in each array 60 may emit light of a corresponding color (wavelength). As one example, the light emitting elements 74 in array 60A may emit red light (e.g., light at a wavelength between 625 nm and 740 nm such as 640 nm), the light emitting elements 74 in array 60B may emit green light (e.g., light at a wavelength between 495 nm and 570 nm such as 510 nm), and the light emitting elements 74 in array 60C may emit blue light (e.g., light at a wavelength between 420 nm and 495 nm such as 440 nm). In general, arrays 60 may emit light at any desired wavelengths (e.g., near-infrared light, visible light, infrared light, ultraviolet light, etc.).

[0040] If desired, one or more lower-resolution arrays such as low resolution arrays 62 (e.g., a first array 62A, a second array 62B, and a third array 62C) may be formed around the periphery of arrays 60 (e.g., at one or more sides of arrays 60). Low resolution arrays 62 may each include one or more columns and two or more rows of cells 76. Low resolution arrays 62 may include larger cells 76 than arrays 60 and light emitting elements 74 in arrays 62 may be spaced farther apart (e.g., provided with a greater pitch) than light emitting elements 74 in arrays 60 (e.g., arrays 62 may exhibit larger angular spreading than arrays 60). Low resolution arrays 62 may be, for example, 1D arrays, 1.5D arrays, and/or 2D arrays. The light emitting elements 74 in each array 62 may be the same color as the light emitting elements 74 in the adjacent array 60 (e.g., light emitting elements 74 in array 62A may emit the same wavelength of light as array 60A, light emitting elements 74 in array 62B may emit the same wavelength of light as array 60B, etc.).

[0041] Low resolution arrays 62 may generate portions of the image frame in the far field with greater angular spreading than arrays 60. This may allow for foveation techniques to be performed on the display images in which a central portion of the displayed image is provided at higher resolution than peripheral portions of the displayed image. This may, for example, mimic the natural response of the user’s eye such that the displayed images still appear naturally to the user while also reducing the resources and data rate required to display the images. Foveation operations may also be performed by dynamically controlling the speed of scanning mirror 42. For example, control circuitry 16 may control scanning mirror 42 to spend more time within the center of the image frame (e.g., by rotating more slowly through the center of the frame) and less time around the periphery of the image frame (e.g., by rotating more rapidly at the periphery of the frame), thereby maximizing image resolution near the center of the frame while sacrificing image resolution near the periphery of the frame.

[0042] If desired, depth sensing and/or pupil tracking circuitry may be included in light sources 14A. In the example of FIG. 5, sources 14A include depth sensing and pupil tracking components 68. Components 68 may include an array 64 of infrared light sources 80. Each infrared (IR) light source 80 may include a corresponding infrared light emitting element 78 (e.g., an IR LED, an IR .mu.LED, an IR VCSEL, etc.). Light sources 80 emit infrared light that is conveyed towards location 24 by optical system 14B (FIG. 1). The infrared light reflects off of the user’s eye back towards light sources 14A through optical system 14B.

[0043] Components 68 of FIG. 5 may include an array 66 of infrared light sensors 82. Each infrared light sensor 82 may include a corresponding infrared light sensitive element 84 (e.g., an IR photodiode, an IR avalanche diode, etc.). Infrared light sensitive element 84 may sense the reflected infrared light and may provide corresponding infrared image signals to control circuitry 16. Control circuitry 16 may process the transmitted and received infrared signals to track the location of the user’s retina (pupil) at location 24 (e.g., within an eye box), the direction of the user’s gaze, to perform depth sensing, and/or to perform any other desired operations based on the transmitted and received infrared signals. Array 64 may include any desired number of cells 80 arranged in any desired pattern (e.g., array 64 may be a 1.5D array, a 1D array, a 2D array, etc.). Array 66 may include any desired number of cells 82 arranged in any desired pattern (e.g., array 66 may be a 1.5D array, a 1D array, a 2D array, etc.).

[0044] If desired, light sources 14A may perform wavelength multiplexing using an additional projector such as projector 72 of FIG. 5. Projector 72 may include a 1.5D array 60 for each array 60 in projector 70 (e.g., where each array 60 in projector 72 includes the same number and pattern of cells 76 as the corresponding array 60 in projector 70). In the example of FIG. 5, projector 72 includes 1.5D arrays 60 such as arrays 60A’, 60B’, and 60C’. Light emitting elements 74 in array 60A’ may emit light that is offset in wavelength from the wavelength emitted by array 60A by a predetermined margin (e.g., 20 nm, 30 nm, 40 nm, between 20 and 50 nm, between 10 and 60 nm, etc.). Similarly, array 60B’ may emit light that is offset in wavelength from the wavelength emitted by array 60B and array 60C’ may emit light that is offset in wavelength from the wavelength emitted by array 60C by the predetermined margin (e.g., array 60A’ may emit 670 nm red light, array 60B’ may emit 540 nm green light, and array 60C’ may emit 470 nm blue light).

[0045] Using an additional wavelength-offset projector such as projector 72 may allow display 14 to perform two different operations on the light emitted by light sources 14A. For example, other optical components 14C (FIG. 2) may include holograms, diffraction gratings, or other structures that are tuned to operate on light of a particular wavelength. Optical components 14C may, for example, include a first hologram that operates on (e.g., diffracts in a first direction) the wavelengths of light produced by projector 70 and a second hologram that operates on the (e.g., diffracts in a second direction) the wavelengths of light produced by projector 72. This may, for example, allow display 14 to display RGB image light that is transmitted to different locations within system 10 using the same physically-narrow light sources 14A.

[0046] The example of FIG. 5 is merely illustrative. In general, any desired number of projectors may be formed within light sources 14A. Any desired number of arrays 60 may be formed within each projector. Each array 60 may include any desired number of cells 76 arranged in any desired pattern. Each array 62 may include any desired number of cells 76 arranged in any desired pattern. One or more of the arrays 60 and/or 62 of FIG. 5 may be omitted. Projector 72 of FIG. 5 may be omitted if desired.

[0047] As shown in FIG. 5, the light emitting elements 74 within each array 60 are horizontally aligned with respect to the light emitting elements 74 in the same column of cells 76 but are vertically staggered with respect to the light emitting elements 74 in the same row of cells 76. For example, the light emitting elements 74 in each column may be located at different positions along the Z-axis (tangential axis) from the previous column of cells 76 and the next column of cells 76. In other words, light emitting elements 74 are vertically staggered within each array 60 (e.g., light emitting elements 74 in each array 60 collectively form a staggered array of light emitting elements having vertical columns and diagonal rows). If desired, there may be multiple copies of each of the light emitting elements 74 shown in each diagonal row of FIG. 5 (e.g., to increase brightness and/or dynamic range relative to scenarios where each column of the diagonal row includes only one light emitting element 74). Staggering light emitting elements 74 in this way may allow arrays 60 to exhibit a fine vertical pitch such that light elements 74 can fill the tangential axis of display system 14 (e.g., parallel to the Z-axis of FIG. 5) with light even though only a single scanning mirror is used to scan parallel to the Y-axis (sagittal axis). This may further serve to maximize the resolution of the projected far-field image.

[0048] FIG. 6 is a front-view of a given array 60 showing how light emitting elements 74 may be staggered in the physical domain while being vertically continuous in the optical domain due to the rotation of scanning mirror 42. The left side of FIG. 6 illustrates the physical domain of an exemplary four-by-twelve cell portion of a given array 60 (e.g., as taken in the direction of arrow 44 of FIG. 2). The right side of FIG. 6 illustrates the optical domain of the light emitted by the four-by-twelve cell portion of array 60 (e.g., as viewed from optical components 14C of FIG. 2 after reflection by scanning mirror 42).