Magic Leap Patent | See-Through Computer Display Systems

Patent: See-Through Computer Display Systems

Publication Number: 20200041802

Publication Date: 20200206

Applicants: Magic Leap

Abstract

Aspects of the present invention relate to providing see-through computer display optics.

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is a continuation of U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 15/488,916, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, and filed on Apr. 17, 2017, which is a continuation of U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/742,249, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, and filed Jun. 17, 2015 (ODGP-4006-U01-C03).

[0002] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/742,249 is a continuation of U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/589,713, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, filed Jan. 5, 2015, and now issued on Dec. 27, 2016 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,529,195 (ODGP-4006-U01)

[0003] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/589,713 is a continuation-in-part of the following:

[0004] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/160,377, entitled “OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING”, and filed Jan. 21, 2014 (ODGP-2001-U01).

[0005] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/163,646, entitled “PERIPHERAL LIGHTING FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING”, filed Jan. 24, 2014, and now issued on Jul. 26, 2016 and U.S. Pat. No. 9,400,390 (ODGP-2002-U01).

[0006] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/172,901, entitled “OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING”, and filed Feb. 4, 2014 (ODGP-2003-U01).

[0007] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/181,459, entitled “SUPPRESSION OF STRAY LIGHT IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING,” and filed Feb. 14, 2014 (ODGP-2004-U01), which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/178,047, entitled “MICRO DOPPLER PRESENTATIONS IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING”, filed Feb. 11, 2014, and now issued on Jan. 5, 2016 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,229,233 (ODGP-3001-U01).

[0008] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/589,713 is also a continuation-in-part of the following:

[0009] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/216,175, entitled “EYE IMAGING IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING”, filed on Mar. 17, 2014, now issued on Mar. 29, 2016 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,298,007 (ODGP-2005-U01).

[0010] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/296,699, entitled “OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD-WORN SEE-THROUGH DISPLAYS”, and filed Jun. 5, 2014 (ODGP-2006-U01).

[0011] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/325,991, entitled “OPTICAL SYSTEMS FOR SEE-THROUGH DISPLAYS”, filed Jul. 8, 2014, and now issued on Jun. 14, 2016 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,366,867 (ODGP-2007-U01).

[0012] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/489,706, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, and filed Sep. 18, 2014 (ODGP-2009-U01).

[0013] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/498,765, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, filed Sep. 26, 2014, and now issued on Jun. 14, 2016 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,366,868 (ODGP-2010-U01).

[0014] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/504,723, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, and filed Oct. 2, 2014 (ODGP-2011-U01).

[0015] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/559,126, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, and filed Dec. 3, 2014 (ODGP-4005-U01).

[0016] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/254,253, entitled “EYE IMAGING IN HEAD WORM COMPUTING”, and filed Apr. 16, 2014 (ODGP-3006-U01).

[0017] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/561,146, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, filed Dec. 4, 2014, and now issued on Mar. 14, 2017 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,594,246 (ODGP-2012-U01).

[0018] U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 14/554,044, entitled “SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS”, filed Nov. 26, 2014, and now issued on Sep. 20, 2016 as U.S. Pat. No. 9,448,409 (ODGP-2013-U01).

[0019] All of the above applications are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

BACKGROUND

Field of the Invention

[0020] This invention relates to see-through computer display systems.

Description of Related Art

[0021] Head mounted displays (HMD) and particularly HMDs that provide a see-through view of the environment are sensitive to the effects of stray light. Where, stray light includes light that is not intended to be included in the displayed image, including light that is scattered or inadvertently reflected from surfaces within the optics of the HMD. This stray light reduces the sharpness and contrast of the displayed image in the HMD. In addition, the stray light causes the black areas of the displayed image to be gray and this effect adversely affects the see-through view of the environment because the see-through view is produced by the combination of the light from the environment and the light from the displayed image, which is in the best case the black portions of displayed image. As a result, it is important to reduce stray light within the optics so that very dark black areas and high contrast can be provided in the images displayed by the HMDs.

SUMMARY

[0022] Aspects of the present invention relate to methods and systems for the see-through computer display systems.

[0023] These and other systems, methods, objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment and the drawings. All documents mentioned herein are hereby incorporated in their entirety by reference.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0024] Embodiments are described with reference to the following Figures. The same numbers may be used throughout to reference like features and components that are shown in the Figures:

[0025] FIG. 1 illustrates a head worn computing system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0026] FIG. 2 illustrates a head worn computing system with optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0027] FIG. 3a illustrates a large prior art optical arrangement.

[0028] FIG. 3b illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0029] FIG. 4 illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0030] FIG. 4a illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0031] FIG. 4b illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0032] FIG. 5 illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0033] FIG. 5a illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0034] FIG. 5b illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[0035] FIG. 5c illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[0036] FIG. 5d illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[0037] FIG. 5e illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[0038] FIG. 6 illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0039] FIG. 7 illustrates angles of combiner elements in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0040] FIG. 8 illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0041] FIG. 8a illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0042] FIG. 8b illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0043] FIG. 8c illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0044] FIG. 9 illustrates an eye imaging system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0045] FIG. 10 illustrates a light source in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0046] FIG. 10a illustrates a back lighting system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0047] FIG. 10b illustrates a back lighting system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0048] FIGS. 11a to 11d illustrate light source and filters in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0049] FIGS. 12a to 12c illustrate light source and quantum dot systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0050] FIGS. 13a to 13c illustrate peripheral lighting systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0051] FIGS. 14a to 14c illustrate a light suppression systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0052] FIG. 15 illustrates an external user interface in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0053] FIGS. 16a to 16c illustrate distance control systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0054] FIGS. 17a to 17c illustrate force interpretation systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0055] FIGS. 18a to 18c illustrate user interface mode selection systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0056] FIG. 19 illustrates interaction systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0057] FIG. 20 illustrates external user interfaces in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0058] FIG. 21 illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0059] FIG. 22 illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0060] FIG. 23 illustrates an mD scanned environment in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0061] FIG. 23a illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0062] FIG. 24 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0063] FIG. 25 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0064] FIG. 26 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0065] FIG. 27 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0066] FIGS. 28a to 28c illustrate DLP mirror angles.

[0067] FIGS. 29 to 33 illustrate eye imaging systems according to the principles of the present invention.

[0068] FIGS. 34 and 34a illustrate structured eye lighting systems according to the principles of the present invention.

[0069] FIG. 35 illustrates eye glint in the prediction of eye direction analysis in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0070] FIG. 36a illustrates eye characteristics that may be used in personal identification through analysis of a system according to the principles of the present invention.

[0071] FIG. 36b illustrates a digital content presentation reflection off of the wearer’s eye that may be analyzed in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0072] FIG. 37 illustrates eye imaging along various virtual target lines and various focal planes in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0073] FIG. 38 illustrates content control with respect to eye movement based on eye imaging in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0074] FIG. 39 illustrates eye imaging and eye convergence in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0075] FIG. 40 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0076] FIG. 41 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0077] FIG. 42 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0078] FIG. 43 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0079] FIG. 44 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0080] FIG. 45 illustrates various headings over time in an example.

[0081] FIG. 46 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0082] FIG. 47 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0083] FIG. 48 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0084] FIG. 49 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0085] FIG. 50 illustrates light impinging an eye in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0086] FIG. 51 illustrates a view of an eye in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0087] FIGS. 52a and 52b illustrate views of an eye with a structured light pattern in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0088] FIG. 53 illustrates an optics module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0089] FIG. 54 illustrates an optics module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0090] FIG. 55 shows a series of example spectrum for a variety of controlled substances as measured using a form of infrared spectroscopy.

[0091] FIG. 56 shows an infrared absorbance spectrum for glucose.

[0092] FIG. 57 illustrates a scene where a person is walking with a HWC mounted on his head.

[0093] FIG. 58 illustrates a system for receiving, developing and using movement heading, sight heading, eye heading and/or persistence information from HWC(s).

[0094] FIG. 59 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0095] FIG. 60 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0096] FIG. 61 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0097] FIG. 62 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0098] FIG. 63 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0099] FIG. 64 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0100] FIG. 65 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0101] FIG. 66 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0102] FIG. 67 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0103] FIG. 68 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0104] FIG. 69 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0105] FIG. 70 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0106] FIG. 71 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0107] FIG. 72 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0108] FIG. 73 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0109] FIG. 74 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0110] FIG. 75 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0111] FIG. 76 illustrates an optical element in a see-through computer display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0112] FIG. 77 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0113] FIG. 78 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0114] FIG. 79a illustrates a schematic of an upper optic in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0115] FIG. 79 illustrates a schematic of an upper optic in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0116] FIG. 80 illustrates a stray light control technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0117] FIGS. 81a and 81b illustrate a display with a gap and masked technologies in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0118] FIG. 82 illustrates an upper module with a trim polarizer in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0119] FIG. 83 illustrates an optical system with a laminated multiple polarizer film in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0120] FIGS. 84a and 84b illustrate partially reflective layers in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0121] FIG. 84c illustrates a laminated multiple polarizer with a complex curve in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0122] FIG. 84d illustrates a laminated multiple polarizer with a curve in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0123] FIG. 85 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0124] FIG. 86 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0125] FIG. 87 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0126] FIG. 88 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0127] FIG. 89 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0128] FIG. 90 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0129] FIG. 91 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0130] FIG. 92 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0131] FIG. 93 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0132] FIG. 94 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0133] FIG. 95 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0134] FIG. 96 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0135] FIG. 97 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0136] FIG. 98 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0137] FIG. 99 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0138] FIG. 100 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0139] FIG. 101 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0140] FIG. 102 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0141] FIGS. 103, 103a and 103b illustrate optical systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0142] FIG. 104 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0143] FIG. 105 illustrates a blocking optic in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0144] FIGS. 106a, 106b, and 106c illustrate a blocking optic system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0145] FIG. 107 illustrates a full color image in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0146] FIGS. 108A and 108B illustrate color breakup management in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0147] FIG. 109 illustrates timing sequences in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0148] FIG. 110 illustrates timing sequences in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0149] FIGS. 111a and 111b illustrate sequentially displayed images in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0150] FIG. 112 illustrates a see-through display with rotated components in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0151] FIG. 113 illustrates an optics module with twisted reflective surfaces in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0152] FIG. 114 illustrates PCB and see-through optics module positions within a glasses form factor in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0153] FIG. 115 illustrates PCB and see-through optics module positions within a glasses form factor in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0154] FIG. 116 illustrates PCB and see-through optics module positions within a glasses form factor in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0155] FIG. 117 illustrates a user interface in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0156] FIG. 118 illustrates a user interface in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0157] FIG. 119 illustrates a lens arrangement in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0158] FIGS. 120 and 121 illustrate eye imaging systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0159] FIG. 122 illustrates an identification process in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0160] FIGS. 123 and 124 illustrate combiner assemblies in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0161] While the invention has been described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, other embodiments would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art and are encompassed herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)

[0162] Aspects of the present invention relate to head-worn computing (“HWC”) systems. HWC involves, in some instances, a system that mimics the appearance of head-worn glasses or sunglasses. The glasses may be a fully developed computing platform, such as including computer displays presented in each of the lenses of the glasses to the eyes of the user. In embodiments, the lenses and displays may be configured to allow a person wearing the glasses to see the environment through the lenses while also seeing, simultaneously, digital imagery, which forms an overlaid image that is perceived by the person as a digitally augmented image of the environment, or augmented reality (“AR”).

[0163] HWC involves more than just placing a computing system on a person’s head. The system may need to be designed as a lightweight, compact and fully functional computer display, such as wherein the computer display includes a high resolution digital display that provides a high level of emersion comprised of the displayed digital content and the see-through view of the environmental surroundings. User interfaces and control systems suited to the HWC device may be required that are unlike those used for a more conventional computer such as a laptop. For the HWC and associated systems to be most effective, the glasses may be equipped with sensors to determine environmental conditions, geographic location, relative positioning to other points of interest, objects identified by imaging and movement by the user or other users in a connected group, and the like. The HWC may then change the mode of operation to match the conditions, location, positioning, movements, and the like, in a method generally referred to as a contextually aware HWC. The glasses also may need to be connected, wirelessly or otherwise, to other systems either locally or through a network. Controlling the glasses may be achieved through the use of an external device, automatically through contextually gathered information, through user gestures captured by the glasses sensors, and the like. Each technique may be further refined depending on the software application being used in the glasses. The glasses may further be used to control or coordinate with external devices that are associated with the glasses.

[0164] Referring to FIG. 1, an overview of the HWC system 100 is presented. As shown, the HWC system 100 comprises a HWC 102, which in this instance is configured as glasses to be worn on the head with sensors such that the HWC 102 is aware of the objects and conditions in the environment 114. In this instance, the HWC 102 also receives and interprets control inputs such as gestures and movements 116. The HWC 102 may communicate with external user interfaces 104. The external user interfaces 104 may provide a physical user interface to take control instructions from a user of the HWC 102 and the external user interfaces 104 and the HWC 102 may communicate bi-directionally to affect the user’s command and provide feedback to the external device 108. The HWC 102 may also communicate bi-directionally with externally controlled or coordinated local devices 108. For example, an external user interface 104 may be used in connection with the HWC 102 to control an externally controlled or coordinated local device 108. The externally controlled or coordinated local device 108 may provide feedback to the HWC 102 and a customized GUI may be presented in the HWC 102 based on the type of device or specifically identified device 108. The HWC 102 may also interact with remote devices and information sources 112 through a network connection 110. Again, the external user interface 104 may be used in connection with the HWC 102 to control or otherwise interact with any of the remote devices 108 and information sources 112 in a similar way as when the external user interfaces 104 are used to control or otherwise interact with the externally controlled or coordinated local devices 108. Similarly, HWC 102 may interpret gestures 116 (e.g captured from forward, downward, upward, rearward facing sensors such as camera(s), range finders, IR sensors, etc.) or environmental conditions sensed in the environment 114 to control either local or remote devices 108 or 112.

[0165] We will now describe each of the main elements depicted on FIG. 1 in more detail; however, these descriptions are intended to provide general guidance and should not be construed as limiting. Additional description of each element may also be further described herein.

[0166] The HWC 102 is a computing platform intended to be worn on a person’s head. The HWC 102 may take many different forms to fit many different functional requirements. In some situations, the HWC 102 will be designed in the form of conventional glasses. The glasses may or may not have active computer graphics displays. In situations where the HWC 102 has integrated computer displays the displays may be configured as see-through displays such that the digital imagery can be overlaid with respect to the user’s view of the environment 114. There are a number of see-through optical designs that may be used, including ones that have a reflective display (e.g. LCoS, DLP), emissive displays (e.g. OLED, LED), hologram, TIR waveguides, and the like. In embodiments, lighting systems used in connection with the display optics may be solid state lighting systems, such as LED, OLED, quantum dot, quantum dot LED, etc. In addition, the optical configuration may be monocular or binocular. It may also include vision corrective optical components. In embodiments, the optics may be packaged as contact lenses. In other embodiments, the HWC 102 may be in the form of a helmet with a see-through shield, sunglasses, safety glasses, goggles, a mask, fire helmet with see-through shield, police helmet with see through shield, military helmet with see-through shield, utility form customized to a certain work task (e.g. inventory control, logistics, repair, maintenance, etc.), and the like.

[0167] The HWC 102 may also have a number of integrated computing facilities, such as an integrated processor, integrated power management, communication structures (e.g. cell net, WiFi, Bluetooth, local area connections, mesh connections, remote connections (e.g. client server, etc.)), and the like. The HWC 102 may also have a number of positional awareness sensors, such as GPS, electronic compass, altimeter, tilt sensor, IMU, and the like. It may also have other sensors such as a camera, rangefinder, hyper-spectral camera, Geiger counter, microphone, spectral illumination detector, temperature sensor, chemical sensor, biologic sensor, moisture sensor, ultrasonic sensor, and the like.

[0168] The HWC 102 may also have integrated control technologies. The integrated control technologies may be contextual based control, passive control, active control, user control, and the like. For example, the HWC 102 may have an integrated sensor (e.g. camera) that captures user hand or body gestures 116 such that the integrated processing system can interpret the gestures and generate control commands for the HWC 102. In another example, the HWC 102 may have sensors that detect movement (e.g. a nod, head shake, and the like) including accelerometers, gyros and other inertial measurements, where the integrated processor may interpret the movement and generate a control command in response. The HWC 102 may also automatically control itself based on measured or perceived environmental conditions. For example, if it is bright in the environment the HWC 102 may increase the brightness or contrast of the displayed image. In embodiments, the integrated control technologies may be mounted on the HWC 102 such that a user can interact with it directly. For example, the HWC 102 may have a button(s), touch capacitive interface, and the like.

[0169] As described herein, the HWC 102 may be in communication with external user interfaces 104. The external user interfaces may come in many different forms. For example, a cell phone screen may be adapted to take user input for control of an aspect of the HWC 102. The external user interface may be a dedicated UI, such as a keyboard, touch surface, button(s), joy stick, and the like. In embodiments, the external controller may be integrated into another device such as a ring, watch, bike, car, and the like. In each case, the external user interface 104 may include sensors (e.g. IMU, accelerometers, compass, altimeter, and the like) to provide additional input for controlling the HWD 104.

[0170] As described herein, the HWC 102 may control or coordinate with other local devices 108. The external devices 108 may be an audio device, visual device, vehicle, cell phone, computer, and the like. For instance, the local external device 108 may be another HWC 102, where information may then be exchanged between the separate HWCs 108.

[0171] Similar to the way the HWC 102 may control or coordinate with local devices 106, the HWC 102 may control or coordinate with remote devices 112, such as the HWC 102 communicating with the remote devices 112 through a network 110. Again, the form of the remote device 112 may have many forms. Included in these forms is another HWC 102. For example, each HWC 102 may communicate its GPS position such that all the HWCs 102 know where all of HWC 102 are located.

[0172] FIG. 2 illustrates a HWC 102 with an optical system that includes an upper optical module 202 and a lower optical module 204. While the upper and lower optical modules 202 and 204 will generally be described as separate modules, it should be understood that this is illustrative only and the present invention includes other physical configurations, such as that when the two modules are combined into a single module or where the elements making up the two modules are configured into more than two modules. In embodiments, the upper module 202 includes a computer controlled display (e.g. LCoS, DLP, OLED, etc.) and image light delivery optics. In embodiments, the lower module includes eye delivery optics that are configured to receive the upper module’s image light and deliver the image light to the eye of a wearer of the HWC. In FIG. 2, it should be noted that while the upper and lower optical modules 202 and 204 are illustrated in one side of the HWC such that image light can be delivered to one eye of the wearer, that it is envisioned by the present invention that embodiments will contain two image light delivery systems, one for each eye.

[0173] FIG. 3b illustrates an upper optical module 202 in accordance with the principles of the present invention. In this embodiment, the upper optical module 202 includes a DLP (also known as DMD or digital micromirror device)computer operated display 304 which includes pixels comprised of rotatable mirrors (such as, for example, the DLP3000 available from Texas Instruments), polarized light source 302, 1/4 wave retarder film 308, reflective polarizer 310 and a field lens 312. The polarized light source 302 provides substantially uniform polarized light that is generally directed towards the reflective polarizer 310. The reflective polarizer reflects light of one polarization state (e.g. S polarized light) and transmits light of the other polarization state (e.g. P polarized light). The polarized light source 302 and the reflective polarizer 310 are oriented so that the polarized light from the polarized light source 302 is reflected generally towards the DLP 304. The light then passes through the 1/4 wave film 308 once before illuminating the pixels of the DLP 304 and then again after being reflected by the pixels of the DLP 304. In passing through the 1/4 wave film 308 twice, the light is converted from one polarization state to the other polarization state (e.g. the light is converted from S to P polarized light). The light then passes through the reflective polarizer 310. In the event that the DLP pixel(s) are in the “on” state (i.e. the mirrors are positioned to reflect light towards the field lens 312, the “on” pixels reflect the light generally along the optical axis and into the field lens 312. This light that is reflected by “on” pixels and which is directed generally along the optical axis of the field lens 312 will be referred to as image light 316. The image light 316 then passes through the field lens to be used by a lower optical module 204.

[0174] The light that is provided by the polarized light source 302, which is subsequently reflected by the reflective polarizer 310 before it reflects from the DLP 304, will generally be referred to as illumination light. The light that is reflected by the “off” pixels of the DLP 304 is reflected at a different angle than the light reflected by the `on” pixels, so that the light from the “off” pixels is generally directed away from the optical axis of the field lens 312 and toward the side of the upper optical module 202 as shown in FIG. 3. The light that is reflected by the “off” pixels of the DLP 304 will be referred to as dark state light 314.

[0175] The DLP 304 operates as a computer controlled display and is generally thought of as a MEMs device. The DLP pixels are comprised of small mirrors that can be directed. The mirrors generally flip from one angle to another angle. The two angles are generally referred to as states. When light is used to illuminate the DLP the mirrors will reflect the light in a direction depending on the state. In embodiments herein, we generally refer to the two states as “on” and “off,” which is intended to depict the condition of a display pixel. “On” pixels will be seen by a viewer of the display as emitting light because the light is directed along the optical axis and into the field lens and the associated remainder of the display system. “Off” pixels will be seen by a viewer of the display as not emitting light because the light from these pixels is directed to the side of the optical housing and into a light trap or light dump where the light is absorbed. The pattern of “on” and “off” pixels produces image light that is perceived by a viewer of the display as a computer generated image. Full color images can be presented to a user by sequentially providing illumination light with complimentary colors such as red, green and blue. Where the sequence is presented in a recurring cycle that is faster than the user can perceive as separate images and as a result the user perceives a full color image comprised of the sum of the sequential images. Bright pixels in the image are provided by pixels that remain in the “on” state for the entire time of the cycle, while dimmer pixels in the image are provided by pixels that switch between the “on” state and “off” state within the time of the cycle, or frame time when in a video sequence of images.

[0176] FIG. 3a shows an illustration of a system for a DLP 304 in which the unpolarized light source 350 is pointed directly at the DLP 304. In this case, the angle required for the illumination light is such that the field lens 352 must be positioned substantially distant from the DLP 304 to avoid the illumination light from being clipped by the field lens 352. The large distance between the field lens 352 and the DLP 304 along with the straight path of the dark state light 354, means that the light trap for the dark state light 354 is also located at a substantial distance from the DLP. For these reasons, this configuration is larger in size compared to the upper optics module 202 of the preferred embodiments.

[0177] The configuration illustrated in FIG. 3b can be lightweight and compact such that it fits into a small portion of a HWC. For example, the upper modules 202 illustrated herein can be physically adapted to mount in an upper frame of a HWC such that the image light can be directed into a lower optical module 204 for presentation of digital content to a wearer’s eye. The package of components that combine to generate the image light (i.e. the polarized light source 302, DLP 304, reflective polarizer 310 and 1/4 wave film 308) is very light and is compact. The height of the system, excluding the field lens, may be less than 8 mm. The width (i.e. from front to back) may be less than 8 mm. The weight may be less than 2 grams. The compactness of this upper optical module 202 allows for a compact mechanical design of the HWC and the light weight nature of these embodiments help make the HWC lightweight to provide for a HWC that is comfortable for a wearer of the HWC.

[0178] The configuration illustrated in FIG. 3b can produce sharp contrast, high brightness and deep blacks, especially when compared to LCD or LCoS displays used in HWC. The “on” and “off” states of the DLP provide for a strong differentiator in the light reflection path representing an “on” pixel and an “off” pixel. As will be discussed in more detail below, the dark state light from the “off” pixel reflections can be managed to reduce stray light in the display system to produce images with high contrast.

[0179] FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of an upper optical module 202 in accordance with the principles of the present invention. This embodiment includes a light source 404, but in this case, the light source can provide unpolarized illumination light. The illumination light from the light source 404 is directed into a TIR wedge 418 such that the illumination light is incident on an internal surface of the TIR wedge 418 (shown as the angled lower surface of the TRI wedge 418 in FIG. 4) at an angle that is beyond the critical angle as defined by Eqn 1.

Critical angle=arc-sin(l/n) Eqn 1

[0180] Where the critical angle is the angle beyond which the illumination light is reflected from the internal surface when the internal surface comprises an interface from a solid with a higher refractive index (n) to air with a refractive index of 1 (e.g. for an interface of acrylic, with a refractive index of n=1.5, to air, the critical angle is 41.8 degrees; for an interface of polycarbonate, with a refractive index of n=1.59, to air the critical angle is 38.9 degrees). Consequently, the TIR wedge 418 is associated with a thin air gap 408 along the internal surface to create an interface between a solid with a higher refractive index and air. By choosing the angle of the light source 404 relative to the DLP 402 in correspondence to the angle of the internal surface of the TIR wedge 418, illumination light is turned toward the DLP 402 at an angle suitable for providing image light 414 as reflected from “on” pixels. Wherein, the illumination light is provided to the DLP 402 at approximately twice the angle of the pixel mirrors in the DLP 402 that are in the “on” state, such that after reflecting from the pixel mirrors, the image light 414 is directed generally along the optical axis of the field lens. Depending on the state of the DLP pixels, the illumination light from “on” pixels may be reflected as image light 414 which is directed towards a field lens and a lower optical module 204, while illumination light reflected from “off” pixels (generally referred to herein as “dark” state light, “off” pixel light or “off” state light) 410 is directed in a separate direction, which may be trapped and not used for the image that is ultimately presented to the wearer’s eye.

[0181] The light trap for the dark state light 410 may be located along the optical axis defined by the direction of the dark state light 410 and in the side of the housing, with the function of absorbing the dark state light. To this end, the light trap may be comprised of an area outside of the cone of image light 414 from the “on” pixels. The light trap is typically made up of materials that absorb light including coatings of black paints or other light absorbing materials to prevent light scattering from the dark state light degrading the image perceived by the user. In addition, the light trap may be recessed into the wall of the housing or include masks or guards to block scattered light and prevent the light trap from being viewed adjacent to the displayed image.

[0182] The embodiment of FIG. 4 also includes a corrective wedge 420 to correct the effect of refraction of the image light 414 as it exits the TIR wedge 418. By including the corrective wedge 420 and providing a thin air gap 408 (e.g. 25 micron), the image light from the “on” pixels can be maintained generally in a direction along the optical axis of the field lens (i.e. the same direction as that defined by the image light 414) so it passes into the field lens and the lower optical module 204. As shown in FIG. 4, the image light 414 from the “on” pixels exits the corrective wedge 420 generally perpendicular to the surface of the corrective wedge 420 while the dark state light exits at an oblique angle. As a result, the direction of the image light 414 from the “on” pixels is largely unaffected by refraction as it exits from the surface of the corrective wedge 420. In contrast, the dark state light 410 is substantially changed in direction by refraction when the dark state light 410 exits the corrective wedge 420.

[0183] The embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4 has the similar advantages of those discussed in connection with the embodiment of FIG. 3b. The dimensions and weight of the upper module 202 depicted in FIG. 4 may be approximately 8.times.8 mm with a weight of less than 3 grams. A difference in overall performance between the configuration illustrated in FIGS. 3b and the configuration illustrated in FIG. 4 is that the embodiment of FIG. 4 doesn’t require the use of polarized light as supplied by the light source 404. This can be an advantage in some situations as will be discussed in more detail below (e.g. increased see-through transparency of the HWC optics from the user’s perspective). Polarized light may be used in connection with the embodiment depicted in FIG. 4, in embodiments. An additional advantage of the embodiment of FIG. 4 compared to the embodiment shown in FIG. 3b is that the dark state light (shown as DLP off light 410) is directed at a steeper angle away from the optical axis of the image light 414 due to the added refraction encountered when the dark state light 410 exits the corrective wedge 420. This steeper angle of the dark state light 410 allows for the light trap to be positioned closer to the DLP 402 so that the overall size of the upper module 202 can be reduced. The light trap can also be made larger since the light trap doesn’t interfere with the field lens, thereby the efficiency of the light trap can be increased and as a result, stray light can be reduced and the contrast of the image perceived by the user can be increased. FIG. 4a illustrates the embodiment described in connection with FIG. 4 with an example set of corresponding angles at the various surfaces with the reflected angles of a ray of light passing through the upper optical module 202. In this example, the DLP mirrors are provided at 17 degrees to the surface of the DLP device. The angles of the TIR wedge are selected in correspondence to one another to provide TIR reflected illumination light at the correct angle for the DLP mirrors while allowing the image light and dark state light to pass through the thin air gap, various combinations of angles are possible to achieve this.

[0184] FIG. 5 illustrates yet another embodiment of an upper optical module 202 in accordance with the principles of the present invention. As with the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the embodiment shown in FIG. 5 does not require the use of polarized light. Polarized light may be used in connection with this embodiment, but it is not required. The optical module 202 depicted in FIG. 5 is similar to that presented in connection with FIG. 4; however, the embodiment of FIG. 5 includes an off light redirection wedge 502. As can be seen from the illustration, the off light redirection wedge 502 allows the image light 414 to continue generally along the optical axis toward the field lens and into the lower optical module 204 (as illustrated). However, the off light 504 is redirected substantially toward the side of the corrective wedge 420 where it passes into the light trap. This configuration may allow further height compactness in the HWC because the light trap (not illustrated) that is intended to absorb the off light 504 can be positioned laterally adjacent the upper optical module 202 as opposed to below it. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 5 there is a thin air gap between the TIR wedge 418 and the corrective wedge 420 (similar to the embodiment of FIG. 4). There is also a thin air gap between the corrective wedge 420 and the off light redirection wedge 502. There may be HWC mechanical configurations that warrant the positioning of a light trap for the dark state light elsewhere and the illustration depicted in FIG. 5 should be considered illustrative of the concept that the off light can be redirected to create compactness of the overall HWC. FIG. 5a illustrates an example of the embodiment described in connection with FIG. 5 with the addition of more details on the relative angles at the various surfaces and a light ray trace for image light and a light ray trace for dark light are shown as it passes through the upper optical module 202. Again, various combinations of angles are possible.

[0185] FIG. 4b shows an illustration of a further embodiment in which a solid transparent matched set of wedges 456 is provided with a reflective polarizer 450 at the interface between the wedges. Wherein the interface between the wedges in the wedge set 456 is provided at an angle so that illumination light 452 from the polarized light source 458 is reflected at the proper angle (e.g. 34 degrees for a 17 degree DLP mirror) for the DLP mirror “on” state so that the reflected image light 414 is provided along the optical axis of the field lens. The general geometry of the wedges in the wedge set 456 is similar to that shown in FIGS. 4 and 4a. A quarter wave film 454 is provided on the DLP 402 surface so that the illumination light 452 is one polarization state (e.g. S polarization state) while in passing through the quarter wave film 454, reflecting from the DLP mirror and passing back through the quarter wave film 454, the image light 414 is converted to the other polarization state (e.g. P polarization state). The reflective polarizer is oriented such that the illumination light 452 with it’s polarization state is reflected and the image light 414 with it’s other polarization state is transmitted. Since the dark state light from the “off pixels 410 also passes through the quarter wave film 454 twice, it is also the other polarization state (e.g. P polarization state) so that it is transmitted by the reflective polarizer 450.

[0186] The angles of the faces of the wedge set 450 correspond to the needed angles to provide illumination light 452 at the angle needed by the DLP mirrors when in the “on” state so that the reflected image light 414 is reflected from the DLP along the optical axis of the field lens. The wedge set 456 provides an interior interface where a reflective polarizer film can be located to redirect the illumination light 452 toward the mirrors of the DLP 402. The wedge set also provides a matched wedge on the opposite side of the reflective polarizer 450 so that the image light 414 from the “on” pixels exits the wedge set 450 substantially perpendicular to the exit surface, while the dark state light from the off pixels 410 exits at an oblique angle to the exit surface. As a result, the image light 414 is substantially unrefracted upon exiting the wedge set 456, while the dark state light from the “off” pixels 410 is substantially refracted upon exiting the wedge set 456 as shown in FIG. 4b.

[0187] By providing a solid transparent matched wedge set, the flatness of the interface is reduced, because variations in the flatness have a negligible effect as long as they are within the cone angle of the illuminating light 452. Which can be f#2.2 with a 26 degree cone angle. In a preferred embodiment, the reflective polarizer is bonded between the matched internal surfaces of the wedge set 456 using an optical adhesive so that Fresnel reflections at the interfaces on either side of the reflective polarizer 450 are reduced. The optical adhesive can be matched in refractive index to the material of the wedge set 456 and the pieces of the wedge set 456 can be all made from the same material such as BK7 glass or cast acrylic. Wherein the wedge material can be selected to have low birefringence as well to reduce non-uniformities in brightness. The wedge set 456 and the quarter wave film 454 can also be bonded to the DLP 402 to further reduce Fresnel reflections at the DLP interface losses. In addition, since the image light 414 is substantially normal to the exit surface of the wedge set 456, the flatness of the surface is not critical to maintain the wavefront of the image light 414 so that high image quality can be obtained in the displayed image without requiring very tightly toleranced flatness on the exit surface.

[0188] A yet further embodiment of the invention that is not illustrated, combines the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 4b and FIG. 5. In this embodiment, the wedge set 456 is comprised of three wedges with the general geometry of the wedges in the wedge set corresponding to that shown in FIGS. 5 and 5a. A reflective polarizer is bonded between the first and second wedges similar to that shown in FIG. 4b, however, a third wedge is provided similar to the embodiment of FIG. 5. Wherein there is an angled thin air gap between the second and third wedges so that the dark state light is reflected by TIR toward the side of the second wedge where it is absorbed in a light trap. This embodiment, like the embodiment shown in FIG. 4b, uses a polarized light source as has been previously described. The difference in this embodiment is that the image light is transmitted through the reflective polarizer and is transmitted through the angled thin air gap so that it exits normal to the exit surface of the third wedge.

[0189] FIG. 5b illustrates an upper optical module 202 with a dark light trap 514a. As described in connection with FIGS. 4 and 4a, image light can be generated from a DLP when using a TIR and corrective lens configuration. The upper module may be mounted in a HWC housing 510 and the housing 510 may include a dark light trap 514a. The dark light trap 514a is generally positioned/constructed/formed in a position that is optically aligned with the dark light optical axis 512. As illustrated, the dark light trap may have depth such that the trap internally reflects dark light in an attempt to further absorb the light and prevent the dark light from combining with the image light that passes through the field lens. The dark light trap may be of a shape and depth such that it absorbs the dark light. In addition, the dark light trap 514b, in embodiments, may be made of light absorbing materials or coated with light absorbing materials. In embodiments, the recessed light trap 514a may include baffles to block a view of the dark state light. This may be combined with black surfaces and textured or fiberous surfaces to help absorb the light. The baffles can be part of the light trap, associated with the housing, or field lens, etc.

[0190] FIG. 5c illustrates another embodiment with a light trap 514b. As can be seen in the illustration, the shape of the trap is configured to enhance internal reflections within the light trap 514b to increase the absorption of the dark light 512. FIG. 5d illustrates another embodiment with a light trap 514c. As can be seen in the illustration, the shape of the trap 514c is configured to enhance internal reflections to increase the absorption of the dark light 512.

[0191] FIG. 5e illustrates another embodiment of an upper optical module 202 with a dark light trap 514d. This embodiment of upper module 202 includes an off light reflection wedge 502, as illustrated and described in connection with the embodiment of FIGS. 5 and 5a. As can be seen in FIG. 5e, the light trap 514d is positioned along the optical path of the dark light 512. The dark light trap 514d may be configured as described in other embodiments herein. The embodiment of the light trap 514d illustrated in FIG. 5e includes a black area on the side wall of the wedge, wherein the side wall is located substantially away from the optical axis of the image light 414. In addition, baffles 5252 may be added to one or more edges of the field lens 312 to block the view of the light trap 514d adjacent to the displayed image seen by the user.

[0192] FIG. 6 illustrates a combination of an upper optical module 202 with a lower optical module 204. In this embodiment, the image light projected from the upper optical module 202 may or may not be polarized. The image light is reflected off a flat combiner element 602 such that it is directed towards the user’s eye. Wherein, the combiner element 602 is a partial mirror that reflects image light while transmitting a substantial portion of light from the environment so the user can look through the combiner element and see the environment surrounding the HWC.

[0193] The combiner 602 may include a holographic pattern, to form a holographic mirror. If a monochrome image is desired, there may be a single wavelength reflection design for the holographic pattern on the surface of the combiner 602. If the intention is to have multiple colors reflected from the surface of the combiner 602, a multiple wavelength holographic mirror maybe included on the combiner surface. For example, in a three-color embodiment, where red, green and blue pixels are generated in the image light, the holographic mirror may be reflective to wavelengths substantially matching the wavelengths of the red, green and blue light provided by the light source. This configuration can be used as a wavelength specific mirror where pre-determined wavelengths of light from the image light are reflected to the user’s eye. This configuration may also be made such that substantially all other wavelengths in the visible pass through the combiner element 602 so the user has a substantially clear view of the surroundings when looking through the combiner element 602. The transparency between the user’s eye and the surrounding may be approximately 80% when using a combiner that is a holographic mirror. Wherein holographic mirrors can be made using lasers to produce interference patterns in the holographic material of the combiner where the wavelengths of the lasers correspond to the wavelengths of light that are subsequently reflected by the holographic mirror.

[0194] In another embodiment, the combiner element 602 may include a notch mirror comprised of a multilayer coated substrate wherein the coating is designed to substantially reflect the wavelengths of light provided by the light source and substantially transmit the remaining wavelengths in the visible spectrum. For example, in the case where red, green and blue light is provided by the light source to enable full color images to be provided to the user, the notch mirror is a tristimulus notch mirror wherein the multilayer coating is designed to reflect narrow bands of red, green and blue light that are matched to the what is provided by the light source and the remaining visible wavelengths are transmitted through the coating to enable a view of the environment through the combiner. In another example where monochrome images are provided to the user, the notch mirror is designed to reflect a single narrow band of light that is matched to the wavelength range of the light provided by the light source while transmitting the remaining visible wavelengths to enable a see-thru view of the environment. The combiner 602 with the notch mirror would operate, from the user’s perspective, in a manner similar to the combiner that includes a holographic pattern on the combiner element 602. The combiner, with the tristimulus notch mirror, would reflect the “on” pixels to the eye because of the match between the reflective wavelengths of the notch mirror and the color of the image light, and the wearer would be able to see with high clarity the surroundings. The transparency between the user’s eye and the surrounding may be approximately 80% when using the tristimulus notch mirror. In addition, the image provided by the upper optical module 202 with the notch mirror combiner can provide higher contrast images than the holographic mirror combiner due to less scattering of the imaging light by the combiner.

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